How to Get Dog Urine Out of Carpet

By now, most have seen the Febreze commercials where the company markets that odors which surround us regularly can cause us to become “nose blind.” If you happen to have missed the series, here’s a link to one that talks about pet odors in your car. Just like pet odors can permeate our vehicles, the soft surfaces in our homes can absorb stains and odors in unpleasant ways. One challenge some homeowners face is how to deal with dog urine spots in their carpet.

As an experienced Realtor, I’ve seen (and smelled) it all. And I can share that some clients have no clue how strongly their pet odors are until we begin to stage their homes for showing. Read on for some tips on how to best treat and eliminate the evidence of such pet accidents and give me a call at 336-575- 7249 to discuss other ways you can get your property showing ready!

Why Does Some Dog Urine Smell So Strongly?

Dog urine is designed to eliminate toxins in the system, so this means it is normal for a dog’s urine to smell pretty pungent. In dogs that have not been “fixed,” the smell of urine is also impacted by hormonal changes regarding reproduction.

What Can You Do if There are New Dog Urine Spots on your Carpet?

First, remember that simple tap water is often the best first removal step. You read that right, tap water. Why? Because urine has a water base and by adding water, you disperse toxins and also add liquid that can be absorbed. Start by gently blotting up what liquid you can from the location. Be careful not to press firmly as you can cause the urine to go deeper into the padding and widen in circumference. After blotting up liquid with a clean towel or cloth, use clean water to re-saturate the area and then continue blotting. If you catch the accident shortly after it occurs, this alone could be enough to remove the urine and any chance of odor.

If you’d like to be certain that no bacteria or odor remains, Canine Journal recommends Nature’s Miracle Urine Destroyer. It’s a product commonly sold at retailers nationwide and has fantastic reviews and backing by vets and carpet cleaning professionals too. Based on the size of the area you are treating, this particular product is sold in both concentrate for carpet steaming machines and spray bottles for spot treatment.

But What if the Stains are Older and More Set?

We all know that getting set stains out of carpet can be a challenge. Our focus is on the elimination of odor, not necessarily the stain as urine can bleach or otherwise discolor various dyes in unique ways. Spend your first time on getting the smell out of the area and then see how much of a stain or discolored area remains to decide upon what approach might be best for aesthetics.

Treating a set-in spot starts in a similar manner to treating a fresh one: apply plenty of clean water to allow the bacteria and stain to begin to lift from the fabric. In this case, your easiest route is usually to borrow, buy, or even rent a water-based carpet cleaning machine as this ensures you can push water deep into the padding and extract it, along with the toxins and bacteria that cause smells. You can also use a wet/dry vac and cycle through applying clean water and then extracting it with the vacuum until most of the stain is removed.

After you have cycled through several times with water and extraction, you’ll want to apply a high-quality pet stain deodorizer like the Nature’s Miracle product referenced above. Be sure to follow the directions on the bottle and to let the area dry completely before trying another round of treatment.

Remember to always keep your pets clear of the area that is being treated until it is completely dry and to follow all manufacturer directions for best results.

These tips should get you started on the right path to removing odors from your carpets in the places where pet accidents have occurred. Remember to be patient as you work to remove the odor and associated stains. Carpet fibers are tough, but over agitation and scrubbing can mat or cause odd wear patterns. It is best to work in stages to remove odors and stains than to rush and cause a fresh set of problems.

What tips do you have for removing doggy urine stains?

Posted on August 19, 2016 at 9:41 am
Ellen Dudley | Category: Blog | Tagged

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